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    Davallia pyxidata. Australian Hare's-foot Fern. Australia. This fern grows fronds to 3 feet in length. An easily-grown fern with woody, erect, or spreading rhizomes and leathery, dark green fronds. Juvenile or sterile fronds may be coarsely-divided, while fertile fronds are much finer. Good as a hanging basket or as a ground cover. Likes humidity, but a greenhouse is not necessary. Low to high light, keep moist.
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    Campyloneurum angustifolium. Central American Strap Fern. Tropical America. This narrow strap is very simple in structure with long narrow strap-like fronds. It is highly variant in detail with blades of varying width and stipes of varying length. It makes an excellent basket fern and grows easily here.
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    Adiantum pedatum. Five-fingered Maidenhair. American Maidenhair. Northern Maidenhair. Eastern US, Canada. Very similar to A. aleuticum this fern is noted for its unusual stipe which branches with each branch turning out at right angles to the other, like a bird's foot. A hardy fern that thrives in cold districts, more difficult in hot climates. May be deciduous. Likes shady conditions and plenty of moisture. Grows best in the ground with a good covering of humus or mulch.
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    Adiantum raddianum. Delta Maidenhair. Central and South America, Mexico, West Indies. This is the maidenhair fern from which most cultivated varieties arise, with no less than 70 variants known and named. It has great variability. In nature it grows in rocky outcrops, cliff faces, and moist stream banks. A majority of the forms like neutral to alkaline soil; need good drainage and fairly bright light. The species plant is seldom seen.
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    Adiantum raddianum. Delta Maidenhair. Central and South America, Mexico, West Indies. This is the maidenhair fern from which most cultivated varieties arise, with no less than 70 variants known and named. It has great variability. In nature it grows in rocky outcrops, cliff faces, and moist stream banks. A majority of the forms like neutral to alkaline soil; need good drainage and fairly bright light. The species plant is seldom seen.
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    Adiantum raddianum. Delta Maidenhair. Central and South America, Mexico, West Indies. This is the maidenhair fern from which most cultivated varieties arise, with no less than 70 variants known and named. It has great variability. In nature it grows in rocky outcrops, cliff faces, and moist stream banks. A majority of the forms like neutral to alkaline soil; need good drainage and fairly bright light. The species plant is seldom seen.
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    Marsilea Drummondii. (No common name) Australia, New Caledonia. This aquatic fern spreads by long creeping rhizomes that root in the mud. The stems reach to the surface and produce four-lobed pinnules with a distinctive brown band. They grow well here and make good ornamental covering for fish ponds.
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    Polypodium formosanum. Green Caterpillar Fern. Japan, Taiwan, South China. A long creeping fern with once pinnate light green fronds and lime green rhizomes that give its common name. It grows well here in a basket, particularly one made of tree fern fiber, which the fern will engulf. It goes dormant during the summer months and grows strongly during the winter. The is one rather strange variant which is known as a 'crested' form because of the spreading nature of the ends of the rhizome.
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    Adiantum raddianum. Delta Maidenhair. Central and South America, Mexico, West Indies. This is the maidenhair fern from which most cultivated varieties arise, with no less than 70 variants known and named. It has great variability. In nature it grows in rocky outcrops, cliff faces, and moist stream banks. A majority of the forms like neutral to alkaline soil; need good drainage and fairly bright light. The species plant is seldom seen.
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    Asplenium nidus. Birds-nest Fern. Pantropical. A large epiphyte which usually grows in the tree tops but can be easily grown in pots, tubs or among rocks in the garden. Grows to be about 5 feet tall. The midrib of each frond is raised and rounded on top, nearly smooth on the bottom. See A. australasicum. This fern is very seldom found here. Most plants sold under this name are, in fact, A. australasicum.
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    Adiantum pedatum. Five-fingered Maidenhair. American Maidenhair. Northern Maidenhair. Eastern US, Canada. Very similar to A. aleuticum this fern is noted for its unusual stipe which branches with each branch turning out at right angles to the other, like a bird's foot. A hardy fern that thrives in cold districts, more difficult in hot climates. May be deciduous. Likes shady conditions and plenty of moisture. Grows best in the ground with a good covering of humus or mulch.
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    Campyloneurum angustifolium. Central American Strap Fern. Tropical America. This narrow strap is very simple in structure with long narrow strap-like fronds. It is highly variant in detail with blades of varying width and stipes of varying length. It makes an excellent basket fern and grows easily here.
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    Various Platyceriums.
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    Various Platyceriums.
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    Fern jungle.
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    Phlebodium pseudo-aureum. Rabbit's Foot Ferns. Florida, Mexico, Central and South America, West Indies. Three species of very similar plants once included with the Polypodiums. Both epiphytic and terrestrial they have large fuzzy rhizomes and long pinnatifid fronds, often of a bluish green color. They are distinguished primarily by the pattern of the sori on the back of the pinnules. P. pseudo-aureum has a single row of sori. It also has its fronds more separated on the rhizome giving it an open airy look.
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    Fern jungle.
If you have a favorite or unusual fern that you are proud of, please feel free to email a photo of your fern to us. If the photo is approved, we will be happy to post your photo. Please provide its name and any other information to help identify it.